Film review – Pandorica

Well, hello there internet friends. I’m back! I took another little writing hiatus to do more book outlining (on which I made great progress) and visit my awesome friend Alex in Australia (on which I ate many delicious indigenous animals). Despite my concerns about that crazy island, I managed not to get mauled by any adorable furry creatures or giant bugs and return home in one piece to you good people.

Although, that meant leaving behind one of my favorite people on that crazy island. Alas.

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Now that I’m finally over my jet lag and back in the swing of things, I’m delighted to get back to the blog with another film review. After my recent watching of Refuge I’ve been optimistic about the increasing quality of independent horror in both writing and production value.

When I saw that another indie film I’d had my eye on was available, I naturally jumped at the chance to see it. Pandorica could be categorized in a number of ways – thriller, horror, apocalyptic, dystopian – and I think that’s one of the really appealing aspects of the film.

It picks up several generations after what they call The Great Reset, some sort of worldwide disaster that decimated all but the most isolated communities. Three youth of the Varosha tribe – Eiren, Thade, and Ares – are preparing to take part in a selection test, during which the tribe’s current leader Nus will select his replacement.

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The selection test is a rather vague process that comes with folklore (told over a campfire, naturally) and is carried out whenever the previous leader feels the next crop of kids are old enough to compete. Normally that would be too generic for my taste, but I do think Pandorica‘s story benefits from being intentionally ambiguous. When things seem to go awry during the test, there’s still a little voice in the back of your head that’s saying, “But maybe that’s how it’s supposed to play out.”

What immediately grabbed my attention even from the trailer was how intensely dark it is. And I mean that quite literally. Most of the action in the film takes place over the course of one night, illuminated only by the moon or torches or campfires. Dealing with shadows in that way is seriously tricky business and I think they handled the self-imposed lighting challenge wonderfully.

There are also several sweeping aerial landscape shots that are absolutely breathtaking. In particular I was enamored with a series of wide pans over the forest as they traveled from their tribal home to the location of the leadership test. This can be attributed partly to the inherent natural beauty of the set location, but even that can’t stand on its own without skilled camera and editing work.

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The plot is not the most original construction – A group of headstrong kids in their late teens or early 20s compete against each other in a selection process to shape the future of their community. That’s kind of par for the course when it comes to modern dystopia, and director Tom Paton has even said in interviews that he sees the setting more as a way to explore interpersonal relationships than explore a likely apocalypse scenario.

The film at its core is about leadership, and earning the right to call yourself a leader. I believe in today’s world, power it [sic] too easily acquired by some and is likely the reason that people at the bottom find themselves mistreated… I think it was about looking at a big message and then applying to the world I know so that hopefully, whatever industry you are in, you can see shades of how you lead and who gets promoted in these characters. (lovehorror.co.uk)

In another interview, he even went so far as to self-identify the setting as cliché.

After reading his thoughts, I went back and watched some sections a second time. A lot of interactions that had previously felt sort of “apocalypse light” to me now play out like the most amazingly intense office team-building retreat ever taken. (And if you’ve ever been subjected to one of those personally, you’ll understand why that’s appealing.) Whether that was his intent or not is kind of irrelevant if it means I enjoy the experience more through that lens.

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The film is not without flaws. There were character actions that were easy for me to telegraph. You don’t really get much introduction to the world beyond a text-on-screen opening montage. Some of the potential impact of the script was lost by having the main characters speak English using an awkwardly manufactured accent.

In the grand scheme of things these flaws are really just minor bumps on an otherwise picturesque road. There’s plenty of imagination involved in setting the scene – especially in makeup and costumes – and it’s easy to see just how much heart went into making this film. It’s clear the cast was fully on board with Paton’s vision and I appreciate his attention to detail.

My overall recommendation – Watch Pandorica. The film takes a well-worn genre and uses it as the backdrop for something intimate and unusual. Though the plot is more about the journey than the destination, it’s still an interesting journey to take. And if nothing else, the movie is a visual feast.

3/5 stars

 

 

 

 

 

 

The year in reviews

Recently I’ve had a bit of brain spark on an idea for a novel that has been stewing in my head for a while. I’m going to try to focus my creative energy on outlining it, which probably means fewer blog posts for a few weeks. Rather than leave you in the lurch, I thought I’d pull together everything I’ve recommended you watch over the past year.

Though I’m not much for year end roundups, anyone who knows me well knows that I can’t pass up a perfectly good opportunity to compile a list.

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I started out the year with a few thematic collections, the first being romantic films that are decidedly odd. This includes FrequenciesIn Your Eyes, and The One I Love. As of this post date, all three are still available to stream on Netflix. They’re all worth watching for different reasons, but if you only have the time or inclination to watch one, I’d say go with The One I Love.

Original post: Stream themes – Bizarre romance

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The second thematic collection were apocalyptic (or otherwise dystopian) movies. A personal favorite category, which some might say makes me a bit of a downer. But I see my interest in societal collapse as a curiosity in human behavior rather than a desire for actual chaos.

The list is mostly television, with a film pick and also an honorable mention that gets points for trying (but ultimately failing to entertain with) a novel premise.

Original post: Stream themes – Flirting with disaster

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My next review was also one of my favorite films of 2015, and definitely a film I’m glad I first saw in the theater. While you no longer have the opportunity to see It Follows on the big screen, you should watch it on a screen that has a robust sound system.

The film is not really all that scary, at least not in a classic horror way. But it is the absolute best kind of creepy, and if you’re someone who finds atmosphere to be engine-revving (I definitely am), then you are in for a treat.

Original post: Film review – It Follows

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What struck me in particular about Advantageous is that it’s dystopian sci-fi with a decidedly female voice. It was written and directed by a woman, all the main characters are women, and its messages are particularly poignant to the female viewer.

Which is not to say that this is a film only for women – I think that men could also gain a lot of insight from watching it. More than the messages though, it’s also beautifully shot and expertly acted.

Original post: Film review – Advantageous

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Next up were two very goofy reviews, and I will admit that I rated them on my B-movie scale rather than a more discerning cinematic one. If you don’t like cheesy horror, they are not for you. But if you do like cheesy horror, they are cheddar-tastic.

Zombeavers (pictured above) is campy as all get-out, but it’s really not trying to be anything otherwise. And Love in the Time of Monsters (pictured below) has its tongue squarely planted in cheek. Both are absolutely ridiculous, but the second is definitely my favorite of the two.

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Original posts: Film review – Zombeavers and Film review – Love in the Time of Monsters.

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This final series of reviews is probably the most ambitious project I’ve ever tackled on this site. It’s also my favorite undertaking of the year, and the longest post I’ve ever written here.

In a moment that was either madness or genius (I am still undecided) I decided to spend a long weekend watching every Hellraiser film in order. With nine total movies in the series, that meant three each day for three consecutive days.

I’ll understand if you don’t want to read the post (either because you’re just not into gore or you’re just not into long reads) but I hope you do. It would be nice to feel as though I’m not just blogging into the void.

Also some, but not all, of the Hellraiser movies really are worth watching. Clive Barker has a unique way of crafting monsters who are not 100% monstrous, and Pinhead is a prime example.

Original post: The nine lives of Pinhead – a Hellraiser experiment

Bonus round

While this isn’t a movie review, I couldn’t leave this post off the list. Partially because I’m proud of the wordplay and partially because, even though I vowed not to, I actually caved and watched the movie a few nights ago.

The movie was absolutely awful. The post, on the other hand, is absolutely delightful.

Stream themes – Bizarre romance

In watching the Golden Globes last night, it became abundantly clear to me that I’m a bit out of touch with the mainstream. I don’t think I’ve seen any of the movies nominated, and only a handful of the television shows. To be fair, a lot of the nominated films haven’t been released yet (or just saw limited release at independent theaters).

And as for the rest of the movies, seeing them in the theater would involve, well, actually going to the theater. The last time I went to the theater was to see Guardians of the Galaxy, and the jerk sitting next to me got really catty when I asked him to stop checking the baseball score and put away his phone. He proceeded to laugh like a deranged donkey throughout the film and intentionally sat his icy cold bottle of water on my leg a few times for good measure.

I much prefer cozying up to a nice quiet streaming session in the comfort of my own home. I’m patient enough that I can wait until movies are released for home viewing, and between Netflix, Amazon Prime and HBO GO, the odds are good I’ll eventually be able to watch whatever it is I’m looking to see.

This past week I’ve been drawn to a category of stories that can best be described as bizarre romance. In each of these films there is a small element of the supernatural wrapped very gingerly inside the natural progression of a relationship. As someone who has issues with suspension of disbelief, I found this approach quite refreshing and wholly enjoyable to watch.

Frequencies is set within an alternate reality where all human beings emit a frequency that determines their place in the world. People with higher frequencies are, in a sense, more closely attuned with the natural order of things. This makes them not only more intelligent but also luckier. I love how matter-of-fact their understanding of frequencies is. Your frequency is like your blood type – you are born with it and it will never change.

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The story isn’t really about frequencies though, not exactly. It’s a commentary on all sorts of topics, including (but not limited to) class, upward mobility, innovation and fate, all woven into several relationships, both platonic and romantic. The movie has flaws, but overall it hits a lot of nails on their collective heads with humor and grace.

3/5 stars

In Your Eyes follows the lives of two strangers as they realize they have a telepathic bond. Each is able not only to see what the other is currently seeing, but also feel through the other’s touch and even talk to the other. Even though this seems like it would be a difficult pill to swallow, they accept the reality of it very easily, which makes it easier in turn for you as the viewer to accept it as well.

The pace is very slow and deliberate, but much to my surprise I didn’t mind that at all. I found myself completely entranced by their conversations, to the point where I was literally on the edge of my seat, leaning toward the television. (Yes, I know how strange that sounds, but it’s true.)

Oh, and in case this description wasn’t enough to catch your interest, the film was written by Joss Whedon.

4/5 stars

The One I Love is by far my favorite of the bunch. I’m not going to say much about it here, because I don’t want to give anything away (rest assured, the above trailer is spoiler-free) but suffice it to say that it perfectly balances comedy and drama. Mark Duplass (of Safety Not Guaranteed, another film I adore) and Elisabeth Moss knock it out of the park as a couple who go on a weekend retreat in an attempt to reconnect.

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It’s the first movie in a long time that made me sad Netflix doesn’t let you give half-star ratings. If I could, I would have given it 4.5 stars (I considered 5, but there were a handful of predictable plot points that made me change my mind).

4/5 stars